Carpet Cleaning FAQ – Can I Remove Candle Wax From My Carpet?

Carpet Cleaning FAQ – Can I Remove Candle Wax From My Carpet?

Something bumped the table where your candle was burning and now there’s a big blob of colored wax hardened and completely infused into the carpet fibers. Believe it or not, candle wax usually can be removed. But, remember that there are two components to that candle. Wax is only one part of your spill. If the candle is one that is colored we will also have to deal with that as well. Of the countless times I have cleaned where there has been a candle wax spill, I have almost always been able to get the wax itself out of the carpet. The color component of the candle though presents a different problem. It can be quite difficult to get the color out since heat was a factor when the color was spilled onto the carpet fibers. The professional cleaner with cleaning wand in hand can simply go over the wax repeatedly until it melts out of the carpet since the water temperature can reach more than 150 degrees at the cleaning tool. Wax is not water soluble, so it is going to take heat to do the job. The color part of the candle we will have to deal with separately as a spot. You may have to deal with wax a different way since you may not have access to cleaning equipment. Here’s how to do it at home.

If the wax spill is hard and large enough, you may be able to remove some of the worst of it by breaking it and picking it up. Use caution here though. Do not pull wax directly off the fibers or you risk distorting them. Just get a large paper bag, your iron, and a terry towel or two. The idea here is that you want the paper bag to absorb the wax when you melt it. But just melt the wax not the carpet fiber. You must constantly check that the wax is melting. Keep that iron moving and look under the paper bag frequently to make sure you are getting the results you want. The wax will gradually be absorbed into the paper bag. If there are still some wax remnants left on the carpet, there are a number of spotting agents that will get the rest out. Find a paint and grease type spotter at a carpet cleaning supply house. You may also need a non-volatile solvent to work on the color part with.

Once the wax is removed and you are satisfied that the color has come out all it’s going to, just rinse the area well to get out the spotting remnants and chemicals you used there. Hopefully the wax and color all came out. If not, the only thing left is to let a professional installer replace that section with a patch and seaming tool.